The IGF-1R/AKT pathway has opposing effects on Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis.

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The IGF-1R/AKT pathway has opposing effects on Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis.

Cancer Biol Ther. 2017 Jul 11;:0

Authors: Davaadelger B, Perez RE, Zhou Y, Duan L, Gitelis S, Maki CG

Abstract

Nutlin-3a is a small molecule MDM2 antagonist and potent activator of wild-type p53. Nutlin-3a disrupts MDM2 binding to p53, thus increasing p53 levels and allowing p53 to inhibit proliferation or induce cell death. Factors that control sensitivity to Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis are incompletely understood. In this study we isolated cisplatin-resistant clones from MHM cells, an MDM2-amplified and p53 wild-type osteosarcoma cell line. Cisplatin resistance in these clones resulted in part from heightened activation of the IGF-1R/AKT pathway. Interestingly, these cisplatin resistant clones showed hyper-sensitivity to Nutlin-3a induced apoptosis. Increased Nutlin-3a sensitivity was associated with reduced authophagy flux and a greater increase in p53 levels in response to Nutlin-3a treatment. IGF-1R and AKT inhibitors further increased apoptosis by Nutlin-3a in parental MHM cells and the cisplatin-resistant clones, confirming IGF-1R/AKT signaling promotes apoptosis resistance. However, IGF-1R and AKT inhibitors also reduced p53 accumulation in Nutlin-3a treated cells and increased autophagy flux, which we showed can promote apoptosis resistance. We conclude the IGF-1R/AKT pathway has opposing effects on Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis. First, it can inhibit apoptosis, consistent with its well-established role as a survival-signaling pathway. Second, it can enhance Nutlin-3a induced apoptosis through a combination of maintaining p53 levels and inhibiting pro-survival autophagy.

PMID: 28696156 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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