Elevated uric acid and adenosine triphosphate concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of eosinophilic pneumonia

Publication date: Available online 10 July 2017
Source:Allergology International
Author(s): Takehito Kobayashi, Kazuyuki Nakagome, Toru Noguchi, Kiyoko Kobayashi, Yutaka Ueda, Tomoyuki Soma, Kenji Ikebuchi, Hidetomo Nakamoto, Makoto Nagata
BackgroundRecent evidence has suggested that the innate immune response may play a role in the development of eosinophilic airway inflammation. We previously reported that uric acid (UA) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), two important damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), activate eosinophil functions, suggesting that these molecules may be involved in the development of eosinophilic airway inflammation. The objective of this study was to measure the concentrations of DAMPs including UA and ATP in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with eosinophilic pneumonia (EP).MethodsBAL was performed in patients with EP including acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, and in patients with hypersensitivity pneumonia, and sarcoidosis. UA, ATP, and cytokine concentrations in the BALF were then measured.ResultsThe UA concentration was increased in the BALF of EP patients. UA concentrations correlated with eosinophil numbers, and with eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and interleukin (IL)-5 concentrations. Furthermore, the ATP concentration was increased in the BALF of EP patients and ATP concentrations correlated with UA concentrations. Moreover, IL-33 was increased in EP patients and IL-33 concentrations correlated with UA and ATP concentrations.ConclusionsThe UA and ATP concentration was increased in the BALF of EP patients. UA concentrations correlated with eosinophil numbers, and with ATP and IL-33 concentrations. Our findings suggest that DAMPs such as UA and ATP play a role in the pathogenesis of EP.

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